About Us

Feracare Wildlife Centre



Feracare Wildlife Centre is a recently founded organisation, it stands for the care of all wild creatures and lives up to its name by providing a safe haven to all animals on its property. Feracare wildlife centre is a reserve in the Waterberg area, Bela Bela.

It was started in October 2015 and is still developing. The reserve currently houses impala, kudu, blue wildebeest, zebra, giraffe, sable, antelope,ostrich and hartebeest and various smaller species. Being a wildlife reserve we have recently spotted a wild leopard male, brown hyena, caracal, porcupine and black back jackal moving freely through the farm.

Visitors can go for hikes or take a drive around the property and admire the game in the bush or by one of the feeding spots or waterholes.Visitors can also book guided tours.

Feracare offers a volunteer program which gives people of any age a chance to work with wildlife and experience the African bush. Feracare is busy setting up an education program in collaboration with the Jane Goodall roots and shoots program and hopes to be educating young South African learners in the near future. Along with volunteers and students we are open to any nature lover.

Ann van Dyk & Kim Hiltrop

Mission statement


To ensure the long-term survival of the cheetah species through maintaining a strong genetic pool with the aim to release them into protected areas if and when they become available.

Vision


The cheetah is fast becoming extinct as a species with the number dwindling from over 100 000 in the 1900’s to a mere 10 000 in 2000 and according to the latest statistics released in 2017 now number only in the region of 7500 animals. Reasons for this decline include habitat loss as a result of growing human population to farmers-predator conflict and an escalation in illegal trafficking which sees youngsters taken from the wild and utilized in the pet trade.

In the 1970’s the cheetah species was classified as endangered however as the result of a very successful breeding project, spearheaded by the legendary Ann Van Dyk, were later, in 1980 downgraded to vulnerable, sadly there is once again an urgent need to reclassify this species as endangered once again.

Over the last 40 years’ extensive research has been conducted regarding the release of captive born cheetah which proved to be very successful. Unfortunately, the space required to do this is not available, however, through extensive education and a well-managed breeding plan we may stand a chance to save this species.

In a means to secure the future of the cheetah, it is imperative to retain a strong genetic pool and this is where the vision of FeraCare Wildlife Centre comes into play. It is our mission to breed such a genetic pool, while researching possible areas into which cheetah can be released to ensure their long-term survival.